Rest in peace, Elizabeth Peña. :(

6elizabeth peña, mirage, the incredibles, seen, large,

howverypleb:

petition to introduce the death sentence for any film critic who uses “lynchian” or “kubrickian”

(via jacques-audiard)

Source: howverypleb

Volver (Pedro Almodóvar, 2006, Spain)
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Volver (Pedro Almodóvar, 2006, Spain)
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Volver (Pedro Almodóvar, 2006, Spain)
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Volver (Pedro Almodóvar, 2006, Spain)
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Volver (Pedro Almodóvar, 2006, Spain)
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Volver (Pedro Almodóvar, 2006, Spain)
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Gone Girl
David Fincher, 2014, USA
No matter how much I instinctively feel something like Gone Girl is well beneath David Fincher’s talents, I have to remind myself this is a contradictory impulse. Just over half of his films give distinct narrative compression and a glean of artistry to their meandering consume-and-forget source material (even the richness of Zodiac is mined from a sensationalist bestseller), most of which he makes into movies I really like. He’s been “slumming it”, as they say, for years now, and he mostly proves just as capable of doing so among the Southern middle-class cul-de-sacs of Gillian Flynn’s tawdry novel, where this story’s married couple from Manhattan will violently prove they cannot. Fincher can elevate the superfluous page-turner into pop art diagramming the shadows lurking around obsession, and his latest may be the prime example of his ability to harmonize opposite ends of his sometimes questionable taste (unless you consider The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo a successful salvage from the hack writer’s cliché heap). While Gone Girl is ultimately a brisk, impassioned, and fun 145-minute whodunit of sorts, it also strikes me as a bit too terse, even for Fincher, in its condensation of Flynn’s flagrant relationship metaphors, clumsy plot reversals, and hasty characterizations of duplicity. I do think this is out of necessity on his part, but to mostly his and partially Flynn’s screenwriting credit, they give an abridged and wisely pruned summation of a novel I definitely don’t need to read in hindsight. The suspiciously lax opening credit sequence—a tense barrage of equally timed cuts between banal suburban exteriors—only functions to ease us into the rushed pace Fincher must move to hold our interest in these two cut-outs of modern marital discord while keeping Flynn’s story from stagnating. Doomed, engendered perceptions of marriage and each other’s sex—especially including ours as her sudden disappearance unfolds and complicates a man’s weak alibi and the wife’s diary that damns him—is a motif Fincher knows well, but has kept relegated as second fiddle to bigger ambitions in previous works. The film’s greatest intrigue lies in witnessing just how calculated and coldly pessimistic he wants to get about true love when it’s placed front and center, and in Gone Girl, he’s found a fledgling household vacant yet exciting enough to embellish his undertones into a bold shade of psychotic resentment. The color suits it all well enough.

3.5/5

6gone girl, david fincher, gillian flynn, rosamund pike, ben affleck, film review, movie review, seensaid, said, large,

Top First Viewings Sep ‘14

  1. Love Streams (John Cassavetes, 1984, USA)
  2. Leila (Dariush Mehrjui, 1997, Iran)
  3. Dark Passage (Delmer Daves, 1947, USA)
  4. Heli (Amat Escalante, 2013, Mexico/Netherlands/Germany/France)
  5. Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters (Paul Schrader, 1985, USA/Japan)

Worthy Mentions: The Hanging Tree, Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work, It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, Starred Up

6love streams, john cassavetes, criterion collection, leila, leila hatami, dariush mehrjui, dark passage, delmer daves, heli, amat escalante, mishima: a life in four chapters, paul schrader, the hanging tree, joan rivers, joan rivers: a piece of work, its a mad mad mad mad world, starred up, seensaid, lists,

If you like the look of traditional media so much, why do them digitally?
Anonymous

samspratt:

While I’ve probably got a 32 page research paper worth of long-winded answers to this in me — covering everything from modern professional workflows in the commercial art industry, to the convergence of art and technology, down to the value of skeuomorphism in the digital age — at the end of the day, I just like the way it looks and don’t want my jeans to be covered in paint stains anymore.

The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012, USA)
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The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012, USA)
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The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012, USA)
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The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012, USA)
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The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012, USA)
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The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012, USA)
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The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012, USA)
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The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012, USA)
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The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012, USA)
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The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012, USA)
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The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967, USA)
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The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967, USA)
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The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967, USA)
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The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967, USA)
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The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967, USA)
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The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967, USA)
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The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967, USA)
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The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967, USA)
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The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967, USA)
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The Graduate (Mike Nichols, 1967, USA)
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Best Films with a Body Part in the Title

  1. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia  Sam Peckinpah, 1974
  2. Claire’s Knee  Eric Rohmer, 1970
  3. Faces  John Cassavetes, 1968
  4. Eyes Without a Face  Georges Franju, 1960
  5. Eyes Wide Shut  Stanley Kubrick, 1999
  6. Adam’s Rib  George Cukor, 1949
  7. Reflections in a Golden Eye  John Huston, 1967
  8. Heart of Glass  Werner Herzog, 1976
  9. The 1,000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse  Fritz Lang, 1960
  10. Baby Face Nelson  Don Siegel, 1957
  11. True Heart Susie  D.W. Griffith, 1919
  12. Cool Hand Luke  Stuart Rosenberg, 1967
  13. A Face in the Crowd  Elia Kazan, 1957
  14. Murmur of the Heart  Louis Malle, 1971
  15. Fists in the Pocket  Mario Bellocchio, 1965
  16. The Soft Skin  François Truffaut, 1964
  17. The Beat That My Heart Skipped  Jacques Audiard, 2005
  18. Baby Face  Alfred E. Green, 1933
  19. Nil by Mouth  Gary Oldman, 1997
  20. 5 Fingers  Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1952

From the “Trivial Top 20” in the September/October 2014 Film Comment

6bring me the head of alfredo garcia, sam peckinpah, claires knee, eric rohmer, faces, john cassavetes, eyes without a face, georges franju, eyes wide shut, stanley kubrick, adams rib, reflections in a golden eye, heart of glass, the 1000 eyes of dr mabuse, baby face nelson, trivial top 20, film comment, lists,

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Camera
Nikon D40x
ISO
200
Aperture
f/5
Exposure
1/100th
Focal Length
30mm
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